I hate serving. Period. • • • #archery #target #targetarchery…

A post shared by Andrew Clark (@clarkmrclark) on

I hate serving. Period.



#archery #target #targetarchery #recurve #recurvearchery #bowstring #serving #halo #8125G

Extend Your Range With These 3 Tips

Your target looks a mile away at full draw. When you release your shot, a second of silence follows as the arrow arcs toward the target. Then comes the satisfying smack as your arrow strikes the bull’s-eye. You can’t help but crack a smile.

Long-range archery shots deliver unexplainable yet undeniable joy. It’s a giggle-inducing fun that keeps you on the range for hours.

With the fun comes a new challenge, however. Farther distances amplify all the little inconsistencies in your shooting form and shot execution. To extend your range, follow these accuracy-enhancing tips.

Anchor Point

Consistency is the key to shooting excellence, and your anchor point – that specific spot where you hold your string hand at full draw – is a key contributor to accuracy. Anchor points vary based archery style, but consistency is their common trait. Your jawbone, for instance, is a great anchor site because it provides a consistent, motion-free launch site.

A secondary anchor point, such as pressing the bowstring to the tip of your nose, further improves accuracy. If you shoot a compound bow with a peep sight, be sure to center your peep in the bowsight’s housing so they look like concentric circles. Recurve archers can align their bowstring with the inside of the sight window to ensure horizontal consistency.

Once properly anchored, your string hand’s work is far from over. It still needs to help you execute a proper release.

Release

To achieve a surprise release, turn off the brain waves that say, “Let go now!” Then relax your fingers or manipulate your release, and let the bowsight float in its natural arc. Photo Credit: World Archery

Whether you use fingers or a mechanical release, a surprise release is vital to accuracy. During an intentional release, your body naturally braces for the shot’s recoil, which causes small movements in your bow. In turn, those tremors cause inconsistent target strikes. You can try resisting the recoil by bracing, but it’s like trying not to flinch when someone feigns a punch to your face.

With a surprise release, your arrow takes flight before your body can react to the shot. To achieve a surprise release, turn off the brain waves that say, “Let go now!” Then relax your fingers or manipulate your release, and let the bowsight float in its natural arc. With a proper release, you’ll see your arrow speeding toward the bull’s-eye before you know the bow fired.

Aiming

One of archery’s common misconceptions is that your sight must be completely still to achieve accuracy. In reality, it’s impossible to make a sight stop moving. The goal for your sight picture is a tight figure 8 floating around the bull’s-eye.

If your sight erratically jumps all over the target or moves up and down or left and right instead of a figure 8, you can improve your aim with stabilizers and form corrections.

Muscle tension in the bow arm’s shoulder often causes bad aim. To alleviate the tension, pull your shoulder low and forward to achieve bone-on-bone support instead of muscle support. Your coach can help you get this right.

Stabilizers move weight away from the bow, balancing it like a tightrope walker’s pole. Every archer uses slightly different stabilizer combinations. Visit an archery retailer to find the right stabilizer setup for your bow, and upgrade your bow with other distance-extending gear.

Practice these tips at comfortable distances, and then slowly back away from the target. By closely following that recipe, you’ll have a great time lobbing arrows long distances at the range.

What’s the farthest bull’s-eye you’ve made? Share it on the Archery 360 Facebook.

The post Extend Your Range With These 3 Tips appeared first on Archery 360.

S3DA: Your Gateway To Youth Archery

Archers can pick up a bow at age 5 and keep shooting the rest of their life. Few sports provide such lifelong enjoyment, which makes archery unique.

An organization that’s forever introducing children to the sport is Scholastic 3-D Archery. The organization’s leader is Jennie Richardson, who spent 10 years coordinating Kentucky’s Archery in the Schools Program. She created S3DA as a next-step program to help beginning archers become lifetime archers. Richardson also wants S3DA students to progress to national archery organizations like ASA, NFAA, USA Archery and collegiate archery.

Richardson said S3DA provides a modified platform for kids that makes it easier for them to make the transition to archery’s parent organizations. S3DA welcomes archers of all skill levels. Beginners can become high-level archers, and more experienced archers can receive advanced coaching and opportunities to compete nationally.

Why start your child in archery? Because they’ll get to participate in an all-inclusive program that makes them part of a team. “If you’re part of something like S3DA, you get peer acceptance, community involvement and camaraderie,” Richardson said.

Archery isn’t like traditional ball sports, where it helps to be athletically gifted. “Archery is 97 percent mental,” Richardson said. “You have to focus, be disciplined and be confident. It doesn’t require as much physical prowess as other sports.”

That means children who can’t run like the wind or hit a ball out of a stadium can still be competitive and have fun in archery. Of course, archery is all about fun, which is why S3DA focuses on 3-D archery.

“Based on our surveys, 100 percent of kids enjoy shooting 3-D,” Richardson said. After all, 3-D archery features a variety of animal targets in wooded settings, which makes it exciting. Kids who have fun shooting eventually want to compete.

Richardson said S3DA holds regional tournaments within states, and then state-level events where students can qualify for national tournaments.

More statistics show this program in 36 states, and they meet after school in various venues. Richardson said about 35 percent of S3DA programs are school-based, and 65 percent work with clubs run by churches, archery retailers, sportsman’s clubs, city parks and municipalities. Photo Credit: S3DA

Although 3-D is S3DA’s most popular discipline, it also teaches indoor and outdoor target archery. “We added outdoor target archery for our college coaches, who were looking for a more well-rounded archer to come to their university,” Richardson said. “We thought it would give our kids an edge going into the collegiate programs.”

S3DA archers can also shoot a variety of equipment, including compounds, Olympic recurves and traditional bows. “We want to be a platform to propel our kids to the national ranks in many disciplines,” Richardson said.

How do you get involved in S3DA? It has programs in 36 states, and they meet after school in various venues. Richardson said about 35 percent of S3DA programs are school-based, and 65 percent work with clubs run by churches, archery retailers, sportsman’s clubs, city parks and municipalities.

To learn more, talk to your local archery retailer or visit S3DA.com to find a program near you.

The post S3DA: Your Gateway To Youth Archery appeared first on Archery 360.

Faith Oakley: One Arm Archery Girl

Doubt and fear: These feelings, unfortunately, are all too familiar when many people consider trying something new.

Some let the fear win, backing out without knowing what could’ve been. But those with faith leap anyway. Faith means trust without proof, and requires courage. That makes faith the perfect name for Faith Oakley.

“I was terrified to try and shoot archery, a sport with mostly able-bodied people shooting,” Oakley said. “But if I didn’t, I would not be half the person I am today.”

She was born with Erb-Duchenne palsy, a condition that prevents use of her right arm. So, when a summer camp counselor asked Oakley to try archery in fourth grade, she almost didn’t. She hesitated a split-second, but then trusted her faith and agreed. The counselor helped Oakley hold the bow and, to her surprise, she shot her first bull’s-eye. That was all she needed to fall in love.

“I did not ever see myself shooting archery,” Oakley said. “If I didn’t try it, a big part of myself and my personality would be lacking. I would not be the same person I am today, and I would not be nearly as successful. I have so many good things to say about archery.”

Oakley proves practice makes perfect bull’s-eyes. She plans to shoot at college, and she’s aiming even higher: She has her sights on the 2024 Paralympic Games in France. Photo Credit: The Seattle Times

Oakley joined her school’s archery team in fifth grade. She’s now a junior at Bethlehem High School in Bardstown, Kentucky, and one of the country’s best student archers. She competes against two-handed archers by using a mouth tab. Her mouth tab is a small piece of nylon that acts like a release. Oakley holds the bow with her left arm, and draws the string with the mouth tab clenched between her molars.

Drawing with a mouth tab sounds tough – and it is. “It takes the same amount of strength to pull back a bow with two hands as it does with your mouth,” Oakley said. Her hunting bow’s draw weight is around 40 pounds, but she wants to crank it up. To stay in shooting shape, Oakley works on her lower body and core strength to improve stability. She’s still trying to figure out how to improve her mouth strength, and she’s confident she’ll eventually find a way.

Oakley bowhunts and shoots competitively. In July 2017 she finished ninth at the National Archery in the Schools Program’s World Tournament in Orlando. And, like most competitive archers, Oakley trains daily.

“Archery is the only sport that I get an adrenaline kick from,” she said. “Because of the competitive level, and that focus and determination you have to have to be any good, archery is really intense. You have to put 100 percent of you into the sport.”

Oakley has been a cheerleader, and played soccer, track, volleyball and basketball, but archery stole her heart. “You don’t have to be the fastest runner, tallest or strongest,” she said. “You need a strong mind, and hard work and dedication. That’s also another special part of the sport: You don’t have to be blessed with good genes.”

Oakley proves practice makes perfect bull’s-eyes. She plans to shoot at college, and she’s aiming even higher: She has her sights on the 2024 Paralympic Games in France. Every arrow she shoots puts her one shot closer to her goal.

Faith Oakley’s faith in her abilities introduced her to archery. Now she’s returning the favor. She has already coached a couple of kids to shoot with a mouth tab, and she’s working to become a certified archery instructor so she can help even more. Photo Credit: The Seattle Times

She’s also making an impact on others. Her story inspires fellow archers and people struggling with physical limitations. Oakley enjoys being a role model, and appreciates the positive response she gets from the archery community when competing. “In my mind, seeing someone do something out of the ordinary makes you think, ‘If that person can do that, I can do anything,’” Oakley said.

She uses her unique platform to encourage others to try archery, especially those younger than her. “I would beg them to at least try it,” Oakley said.

Oakley encourages everyone to visit a local archery shop and try the sport. She says archery teaches patience, commitment and strength. “I’m all about impact and inspiring people, especially kids who are my age or even younger. If they’re able to see someone do something, and that inspires them to go out of the their comfort zone, I’m A-OK with that.”

Years ago, Faith Oakley’s faith in her abilities introduced her to archery. Now she’s returning the favor. She has already coached a couple of kids to shoot with a mouth tab, and she’s working to become a certified archery instructor so she can help even more.

But Faith Oakley’s bigger story is her broad impact on those around her. Every person hearing her story gets an opportunity to spread her message of faith. “If there’s something you want to do, no matter what obstacles you have, take that dream and run with it,” she said.

That’s a lesson in the meaning of faith, from Faith herself.

The post Faith Oakley: One Arm Archery Girl appeared first on Archery 360.