Which Pro Archer are You?

Many excellent archers inspire and dazzle us by brilliantly displaying their skills on the sport’s world stage. These top-shelf archers include Sara Lopez, Steve Anderson, Casey Kaufhold, Jack Williams, Brady Ellison and Paige Gore.

Even though these elite archers compete internationally, you might have more in common with them than your shared passion for archery. Take the quiz below to see which archer you’re most like, and then read more about them by clicking the link found in your results.

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Hip vs. Back: Choose the Right Quiver for You

Whether you bowhunt or shoot target archery, you want quick, easy access to your arrows. Cue the quiver, the accessory that holds your arrows. If you want a quiver that’s portable, detaches from your bow, and carries many arrows, a hip or back quiver might be the best fit.

But which quiver type should you choose? Like most wearable gear, quivers come in different looks and styles. The main difference between hip quivers and back quivers is that one hangs off your hip while the other hangs across your back. You must also choose between two types of hip quivers: target and field.

Hip Quivers:

Target quivers, however, offer more storage pockets and clips for accessories and tools. As with field quivers, target quivers hang off the hip with a clip or belt. They also have three to four built-in plastic tubes that separate your arrows.  Photo Credit: World Archery

Target Quiver

The name says it all. Target archers who like hip quivers often go for target quivers, which lean the arrows’ fletching forward and their points down. That makes it much easier to see and sort through your arrows. If you shoot a variety of arrows or number them, target quivers are ideal. Grabbing arrows from target quivers requires just a quick reach to your side.

What’s their downside? Christine Harrelson of Christine Harrelson Archery is an archery pro and instructor. She notes that target quivers can sway and hit your side more so than field quivers as you walk at 3-D or field shoots. They also tend to stick out in front, which can be inconvenient during competitions.

“I’ve always felt this style quiver was more likely to interfere with a shooter standing in front of me,” Harrelson said.

Target quivers, however, offer more storage pockets and clips for accessories and tools. As with field quivers, target quivers hang off the hip with a clip or belt. They also have three to four built-in plastic tubes that separate your arrows. They’re usually made of leather or synthetic fabrics.

Grabbing an arrow from field quivers requires a short, simple motion similar to that used with target quivers. Instead of reaching in front of you, however, just reach behind. Photo Credit: World Archery

Field Quiver

If you enjoy field courses or 3-D ranges that snake through woods, consider using a field quiver, which is basically a target quiver that leans the fletching backward and the points down. In that position, arrows catch on branches less often.

Harrelson prefers her arrows to lean backward like those in a field quiver, but she customized her quiver to reduce the angle.

“I did this so the arrows wouldn’t hit the person behind me when standing on a very tight shooting line, as often happens at indoor tournaments,” Harrelson said.

Grabbing an arrow from field quivers requires a short, simple motion similar to that used with target quivers. Instead of reaching in front of you, however, just reach behind.

One downside of field quivers is that you can’t conveniently see which arrow you’re grabbing without looking behind you. You’ll need to count your arrows as you shoot or turn to identify numbered arrows.
Field quivers are the traditional hip quiver. Clip them to a belt loop or onto your belt. They’re also archery’s lightest quivers. They’re typically made of leather or synthetic fabrics, and they’re easy to pack in your bag or bow case. Many feature customizable arrow-management systems and a small pocket for extra gear.

Back Quiver:

Some field and 3-D archers prefer back quivers because they don’t get in the way while walking a course or navigating through the woods. They’re also versatile, accommodating right- or left-handed shooters. Photo credit: ATA

“Robin Hood” or “Hunger Games” movies always come to mind with back quivers. They’re the preferred arrow carriers of traditional archers, and sling diagonally across your back.

Some field and 3-D archers prefer back quivers because they don’t get in the way while walking a course or navigating through the woods. They’re also versatile, accommodating right- or left-handed shooters.

To pull an arrow from a back quiver, you must reach over your shoulder and feel for it. It takes a little practice, but you can reload quickly because your hand is already near the arrows after each shot.

And because archers must occasionally bend their knees to pick something up or look for something on the ground, they can dump their arrows accidentally.

“Archers quickly realize that bending over with a back quiver is a big no-no,” Harrelson.

You’ll also want to count your arrows as you shoot because you won’t be able to see how many arrows are left in your quiver.

Back quivers hold lots of arrows, but usually don’t have pockets or pouches for storage. They typically have a traditional design, and are made of leather or leather-like materials.

Although quivers are functional, Harrelson said they can also express style and personality. Your quiver choice is just a matter of preferences. Try all three types to help you decide which quiver is best for you.

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Such a beauty! • • • #archery #bow #arrows #X10 #handboog…

Such a beauty!



#archery #bow #arrows #X10 #handboog #recurve #recurvearchery #target #targetarchery #outdoors #hoyt #faktor #thewinningfaktor #silverice #easton #eastoncontour #axcelsights #archerygb #worldarchery #TASH

Video: How to Adjust Your Sight

What’s the difference between accuracy and precision? Accuracy is hitting where you aim. Precision is hitting the same spot every time. Archery requires both.

To achieve precision, you need good form and equipment. Accuracy is easier. You simply move your sight until the arrows hit where you aim.

To get started, you’ll need Allen wrenches. Most sights require an Allen wrench to loosen the screws and make adjustments. Pick up a set the next time you visit the archery store, and ask the experts for tips on how to use and adjust your sight.

Watch this video for instructions on how to make the best sight adjustments for your bow. You can also check out the detailed instructions below. to help you get started.

Sight Adjustment 101

To start adjusting your sight, stand close to the target so you can easily shoot three arrows into a “group.” A group is a cluster of arrows that strike close to each other in the target. Why three arrows? By adjusting your sight for the three-arrow average, you reduce human error. If you can shoot three arrows into a tight group, you’ve mastered the hardest part of precision.

Next, adjust your sight to achieve accuracy. First, adjust your horizontal plane. If your arrows group to the left, move your sight to the left. If your arrows hit to the right, move your sight to the right.

To help remember which way to move your sight, imagine adjusting it until it covers your group. Make small adjustments until you get a feel for how far to move the sight. Here’s a tip: Close distances require greater adjustments to see results. Farther distances need smaller adjustments.

Next, make your vertical adjustments. If you use a sight with multiple pins, set the top pin as the closest distance, and the bottom pin as the farthest. If you use a single-pin sight, keep track of your settings by marking the sight tape.

As with your horizontal adjustments, chase the arrows with your sight. If your arrows hit high, move your sight up. If your arrows hit low, move your sight down. It’s that easy! To shoot farther distances, keep moving away from the target until you run out of pins or your groups become inconsistent.

Sighting-in takes some “guess and check.” Don’t get discouraged if you make the wrong adjustment, or struggle to perfectly align the sight. Just keep making small adjustments and focus on making good shots.

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When the X10s can’t hit 100 yards reliably, we go back to…

When the X10s can’t hit 100 yards reliably, we go back to the ol’ faithful ACEs.

With a 40# draw the X10s are just too heavy for an accurate sight extension (i.e. all the way in) and so with upcoming tournaments shooting 100 yards I need to revert back to ACEs. Being lighter they can hit on target with the sight fully out providing better sight marks.

I just hope there’s not much wind at those tournaments 😂



#archery #bow #arrows #X10 #handboog #recurve #recurvearchery #target #targetarchery #outdoors #hoyt #faktor #thewinningfaktor #silverice #easton #eastoncontour #axcelsights #archerygb #worldarchery #TASH